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Ben Mamoud
U.S. b. 1935
Approach #11 2003.0055

Approach #11 2003.0055

Mamoud is interested in surrealism, the figure, and abstraction. These figures or a figure through time and space approach the edge of the canvas and, in the left foreground, a flattened space resembling a trap-door. The artist lives in DeKalb, Illinois and is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University.

John Marin
U.S. 1870-1953
Adirondacks I 93.0002

Adirondacks I 93.0002

John Marin is considered one of the outstanding watercolorists of the twentieth century. Many of his compositions, such as Adirondacks I, include mountains. These typically exude the Fauve-like lyricism of Henri Matisse while creating delicate atmospheric effects similar to James McNeill Whistler's. The Armory Show in 1913 made a profound impact upon Marin's outlook and style. In Europe, he had failed to come into contact with avant-garde movements and artists, being drawn primarily to Whistler's work, but after the exposure and serious attention abstraction received at the Armory Show, Marin began to develop a much more distinctive and abstract approach to his two favorite subjects-city life in New York and scenes of the Maine coast. Marin was nearly thirty, working as an architectural draughtsman, before he decided to attend Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and then the Art Students' League. Traveling to Europe in 1905, Marin stayed for five years, mainly in Paris, to pursue additional studies. While in Paris, he was discovered by the American photographer Edward Steichen, who in turn, introduced him to Alfred Stieglitz. Marin exhibited at Stieglitz's New York gallery, "291" alongside Max Weber, Arthur Dove, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Stieglitz continued to support Marin's artistic endeavors, and the two formed a life-long friendship

Reginald Marsh
U.S. 1870-1954
Tug Boat -New York Harbor OP 115

In the 1930s, Reginald Marsh was commissioned for two mural projects, Post War America, for the Museum of Modern Art, which was never executed full scale, and a cycle for the Custom House rotunda. Both included paintings of tugs and other boats in New York harbor. It is likely that this work was related to one of those two projects. Until 1930 Marsh worked mainly as a newspaper illustrator, but he soon took up painting, first oil, then watercolor, egg tempera, and Chinese ink. During the 1930s he became well known for his portrayal of New York "types," concentrating on the shabby and tawdry, cheap and grubby street life of the Bowery district in New York. He was capable of great satire against wealthy and complacent New Yorkers.

Nicholas Marsicano
U.S. b. 1914
White Goddess 72.0018

White Goddess 72.0018

Homer D. Martin
U.S. 1836-1897
An Autumn Sunset 29.0601

An Autumn Sunset 29.0601

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